FREE MONEY!!!!

in Education, Law, Photography, Photojournalism, Photojurnalism, Remember, The BPPA by thebppa

Ok – now we have your attention. Every year DACS ( The Design and Artists Copyright Society) collects millions of pounds worth of royalties due for use of our photographs from libraries, universities and other organisations. It is payment for lending books, photocopying and things like that. They then redistribute this money to us through the “Payback Scheme” – and

thebppaFREE MONEY!!!!
Ian Forsyth

Self-publishing ‘Coast People’

in Current Affairs, Features, Journalism, Photojournalism by Ian Forsyth

As I write this post sitting at my desk in my home office I am surrounded by an ever-increasing collection of photography books. Books that I have been gathering over many years firstly as an amateur with a keen interest and now as a working professional photographer. Over these years and I assume like many other photographers I have always

Ian ForsythSelf-publishing ‘Coast People’

Our Draft Code of Conduct

in Current Affairs, Ethics, Journalism, Law, Photography, Photojournalism, Press Photography, The BPPA, The Leveson Inquiry, Uncategorized by thebppa

  Immediately after the Leveson Inquiry we started to think about how a code of conduct could be drafted for The BPPA that would help prospective members and the British public understand what our profession is all about. We looked at similar documents from all over the world and we looked at the various codes of conduct and practice that

thebppaOur Draft Code of Conduct
Sir John Tenniel

What’s going on at DACS? Part 2

in Current Affairs, Journalism, Law, Photography, Photojournalism, Press Photography, The BPPA, Uncategorized by Andrew Wiard

In this second part of his assessment of what is happening with DACS, Andrew Wiard explains why the current situation is not something that photographers should accept. “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.” Insisting on ALL secondary rights – does it really matter? Is it

Andrew WiardWhat’s going on at DACS? Part 2
Andrew Wiard

A Gun To Our Heads – The new DACS Agreement, part 1

in Current Affairs, Journalism, Law, Photography, Photojournalism, Press Photography, The BPPA by Andrew Wiard

In the first of a two-part blog post Andrew Wiard, a member of The BPPA’s Board, asks “What’s going on at DACS?” Last year we all had to sign a new agreement, and if we didn’t – no annual payout at Christmas. So, why? Short answer, because DACS is at the bottom of a collecting society food chain, and they are all

Andrew WiardA Gun To Our Heads – The new DACS Agreement, part 1

An open letter to Time Inc UK

in Current Affairs, Journalism, Open letter, Opinion, Photography, The BPPA by thebppa

  When several photographers started getting letters from Hamish Dawson, Publishing Director  of  Time Inc.(UK) Ltd, Specialist Sport and Leisure with a new rights grab which asked them to agree to sign away all rights in any work that they carried out for the magazines and websites in the group we decided to write to him. Below is that letter and below

thebppaAn open letter to Time Inc UK

British Photographic Council concerns over consequences of new copyright law

in Current Affairs, Ethics, Features, Journalism, Law, Photojournalism, Press Photography, The BPPA by thebppa

This is a re-posting from the British Photographic Council’s website. The BPPA is a member of the BPC and members of The BPPA’s Board have been deeply involved in the process so far. Government adopts “friendless, unnecessary, poorly explained and fraught with risk” new copyright legislation, against united opposition from the photographic sector. In all of the publicity over the

thebppaBritish Photographic Council concerns over consequences of new copyright law

The Copyright Fight

in Current Affairs, Ethics, Journalism, Law, Opinion, Photography, Photojournalism, Press Photography, The BPPA by Eddie Mulholland

As the song goes ‘There may be trouble ahead’…except this time there is no ‘maybe’ about it. For those that recall the less-than-wonderful “Clause 43” of Labour’s “Digital Economy Bill” which proposed to legalise the use of Orphan Works and Extended Collective Licensing – well, despite its defeat it’s back and this time it’s personal. Hidden away in a completely

Eddie MulhollandThe Copyright Fight